Trust Me, I’m your Manager

We recently spoke to a supervisor who complained that her team had no respect for the job or her authority. What made matters worse was the fact that she felt management neither cared or supported her in her duties. Generating trust and respect of management by employees in the workplace is essential for productivity, team morale, employee retention and development of a positive corporate culture. But it takes time and planning to achieve. In short – you can’t just ask for respect; trust and respect needs to be earned.

There are five never changing guides to follow by supervisors and managers in their quest to build respect and a positive corporate environment are simple. We won’t try to fool you, the hard part is commitment and follow through.

Manager’s Roadmap to Respect:

First, if you want to be respected, you need to respect others. Take time to listen with understanding. Don’t abuse your employees’ time and effort. Don’t ask an employee to perform duties that you would not do.

Second, managers truly do need to lead by example. It’s an old tried and true statement but essential for development of trust. Don’t belittle, gossip, or lie. Be completely upfront and let your team know that what you say, you believe. How you conduct yourself should never be at the expense of another. And the manner you treat others is how you, yourself would want to be treated.

Third, be open about business issues. If restructuring is on the horizon, help prepare your team. If important to the team, news, both good and bad needs to be shared truthfully with the team. You want your team to believe you when you speak.

Fourth, if you’re wrong admit it and if you don’t know, say you’ll find out. Too many times we see managers that feel they need to be right all the time. It just doesn’t happen. We’re human and make mistakes. One of the most respected traits of a good manager is the ability to correct a wrong.

Finally, if you want your team to be loyal show your loyalty to them. Don’t gossip and do not tolerate gossip. Stand up for your team members and team. Make them know their contribution is a priority in the business structure.

Set the tone for your small business or department by demonstrating good character. Avoid lying and spinning company news when under pressure. Admit when you don’t know the answer, and promise to find answers if possible.